In recent years British seaside towns have seen a resurgence of interest from visitors, as they reinvent themselves and re-discover their mojo. With high-quality local dining, five star accommodation, and dramatic settings they are bursting with history and romance.     

Whitstable

Few places can symbolise the re-emergence of the UK seaside town better than Whitstable in northeast Kent. The town is part of the city of Canterbury, with long historical and literary connections. For lovers of lesbian romance it was the home town of narrator Nancy in Sarah Waters’ Tipping the Velvet.  

For red-blooded romantics looking for aphrodisiac inspiration, Whitstable is home to the Whitstable Oyster Festival, a modern annual event that re-creating ancient traditions honouring the town’s unique oyster harvest. The festival includes a symbolic landing and blessing of the oyster catch and fishing fleet, followed by a lively procession through the town, dancing, eating, and merrymaking.

Brighton

Apart from the fact that it is the millennium city of Brighton & Hove, Brighton is arguably unique among UK seaside towns in that it has never really lost its position as a naughty but nice destination of choice for those in the know.

Its reputation stems from the time of the British regency in the 1700s when the young Prince Regent, keen to escape much of the pomp of a stifling royal court, established a holiday home in the town decorated in the romantic tradition of the East.

The Brighton Pavilion still stands today, welcoming visitors and giving them a romantic taste of decadent high life. Click here for Brighton hotel deals.

Southport

If you prefer your romance tinged with a little melancholy then Southport on Merseyside is the classic 1980s ‘seaside town that they forgot to close down’ about which Morrissey sang Every Day is Like Sunday.

This seaside town, which by some quirk of tides and drifting sands is now about a mile away from the water, boasts a bleak, wind-swept pier stretching into the sand flats of the Irish Sea and the largest independent flower show in Europe, from where you can get your gladioli. 

Alexandria

If you thought Alexandria was a seaside city on the northern coast of Egypt then you would be wrong. Alexandria is a small resort town on the Western coast of Scotland. Admittedly, it is just a few miles inland along the estuary of the river Barton, but in arguably the most romantic stretch of the country, where the coastline is laced with bonny lochs, who is arguing?    

Aberystwyth

Take your pick of romantic destinations on the lush Welsh coast, but Aberystwyth wins its place here for it combination of remote countryside and cliff-top walks and its proud position at the heart of Welsh culture. The city is home to the National Library of Wales, or Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru, to put it properly.


Resources

Whitstable Oyster Festival -  The town’s romantic tradition revived.

The Smiths - Old romantics from the 1980s.

The National Library of Wales - Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru.


 
 

Paris

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It is the capital of love par excellence. Maybe it is because the first cinematographic projection was shown in this city. From then on, it has been the setting for many films from different nationalities but with a common denominator: romance.

You will have the opportunity to walk around the Champs Elysees, take a picture from the top of the Eiffel Tower or see the moon reflected on the Seine River.



Verona

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Placed in the North of Italy, this city was the perfect stage in which Shakespeare imagined one of the most ever popular stories about love, Romeo and Juliet.

Verona contents in itself great artistic, cultural and historic depth. It still retains its original medieval appearance and certain elements of Roman architecture.


Venice

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It is probably, together with Verona, the most romantic Italian city. When you think Venice you think of an embracing couple inside a boat powered by a gondolier.

Art, romanticism and beauty is breathed in every corner of the city.